People at the heart of WWF-Pakistan – Vinod Kataria

Vinod Kataria completed his education in 2004, with an MSc (Hons) in Zoology from the University of Sindh Jamshoro. He started his professional career as a Social Organizer at SAFWCO, where he worked for three years. Following that he joined the Research and Development Foundation as Site Coordinator before getting an opportunity at AKPBS-P as Team Lead for social mobilization.

Copy rights WWF-Pakistan

In 2010, Vinod joined WWF-Pakistan’s Indus for All Programme as a Natural Resource Management Officer at the Pai Forest site, (Nawabshah), Shaheed Benazirabad. Once the programme came to a close, he shifted to the Chotiari Conservation and Information Centre, Sanghar office working as a Senior Project Officer in multiple livelihood and conservation projects. Currently, he is working as a Community Mobilization and Training expert in the Indus Ecoregion Community Livelihood Project (IECLP).

For the time that he has spent with WWF-Pakistan, he credits the organization for the rich experience that it has provided him. He has developed an in-depth knowledge of fisheries, livestock and agriculture sectors, in addition to learning about the conservation of fauna and flora of both terrestrial and aquatic species in general.

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Potential of large scale solar plants in Pakistan

by Faraz Ahmed

Pakistan has been recently in the news for the solar potential it has. In March this year, the Alternative Energy Development Board (AEDB) and World Bank produced the solar map of the country. This was created by drawing data from nine solar data stations and 12 wind masts installed across the country. What it showed it that the country has better solar radiation than even Germany which is the leader in using solar energy for energy consumption. Continue reading

Navigate the heat

by Fatima Arif

Since the last couple of years, humans have been breaking the wrong kind of record; the rising temperature record! Each passing year is declared the hottest year compared to the previous one.

In Pakistan, the current week is expected to be the hottest week by far in the country with temperature raising to 42 degrees in many cities. And this is  just April, the traditional summer peak months have yet to show what they have in store for us. Given the current trend, it is safe to predict that the coming months will roast us. Serves us right for still not taking climate change seriously!

It is import to take precautions against the heat as it has a direct impact on our health. Continue reading

Metamorphosis

By Ayesha Aman

People say the woods are scary, I hear them whispering about it when they’re passing through. I never understood why, maybe it was because they didn’t know it as well as I thought I did. It was the only place I’ve ever called home. My daddy brought us to this part of the forest when the elder called for our species to grow. They used a very hard word, something like extension or extinction – mommy said he meant us deer were dying out. So I left my friends behind and followed my parents all the way here. Continue reading

Warmer Temperatures are Escalating Human-wildlife Conflict in Northern Fringes of Pakistan

On Snow Leopard Day this year we highlight the threat this beautiful big cat faces. 

For livestock herders Shafyat Ali and Muhammad Ibrahim, life has changed.  In Hoper Valley, Pakistan, global climate change has had a visible impact on the environment so crucial for their livelihoods.  Over the last 25 years the snowline has shifted upwards by about 1,000 m. Vegetation has shifted upwards with it, and summers are warmer and longer. This means herders have had to change their traditional behaviours; “Twenty years back we used to stay in high altitude pastures from mid-May till mid-September but now they go 10 to 15 days early (mid-April) and return back late again 10 to 15 days (first week of October) from the pastures.” Continue reading

Salman Rashid – Odysseus of Pakistan’s travelogues

by Fatima Arif

This quote by Martin Yan sums up the role travelling plays in the developing our minds. “People who don’t travel cannot have a global view, all they see is what’s in front of them. Those people cannot accept new things because all they know is where they live.”

When it comes to travelling it is not just  travelling to other countries that help form your perspective (though that definitely is a plus) but visiting places  can introduce to experiences that would help your intellectual growth.  Continue reading

New findings for Pakistani flora

© Sadul-Islam / WWF-Pakistan

© Sadul-Islam / WWF-Pakistan

by Sadul Islam

WWF-Pakistan survey team during its ecological assessment studies found several new species, some of these were new for Sindh, Pakistan and even for science. Striga gesnerioides is one of these species found during the natural vegetation assessment at Thatta district. The species was identified with the help of Dr Surraya Khatoon, Professor of Botany, University of Karachi. Continue reading

Tofiq Pasha Mooraj – A Life Fueled with the Passion for Nature

By Fatima Arif

Tofiq Pasha Mooraj, is commonly recognized for his television shows Bagh Baani, Kitchen Garden and Go Camping with Pasha. However, there is a whole range of things that he has been involved in. If one has to sum up his forty plus years of work, it can be said that he has dedicated his life for a better and sustainable tomorrow. Despite all that he has done and continues to do, he has personally never called himself ‘an environmentalist’. Continue reading

Swit Salone

By Samirah Siddiqui

I spent a month in Freetown, Sierra Leone, working with The Collective, a capacity building social enterprise, and Conscience International, a West African human rights NGO.  Sierra Leone is one of West Africa’s true hidden gems – rich in natural resources, with a stunning coastline and brilliant people. For the uninitiated, the country’s name evokes images of blood diamonds and child soldiers. Continue reading